What Narcolepsy Really Looks Like. Spoiler Alert- It Sucks.

I have narcolepsy with cataplexy, and it can be very frustrating to try to explain what it's like to people who have never seen narcolepsy in real life, and how much of a struggle it can be. Most people think that it's funny until they see what actually happens, or they are completely unprepared and get really scared and panic.I filmed this by accident, and it was really weird to go back and watch later from an outside perspective. I am posting this video as a way to help educate people, so please no trolling. Just like people with epilepsy, I can't control having a sleep attack or cataplexy any more than they can control having a seizure. Thank you for your understanding.

And in case you were wondering what I kept looking at, I had the choreography written out next to the camera so that I wouldn't lose my place in the dance.

Soran Bushi Japanese Fisherman's Dance

Music from the Bleach Soundtrack- Nothing Can Be Explained by Mike Wyzgowski. I don't own it and claim no rights to the song.


Coolest Lock Ever

The patent of this lock:
https://www.google.com/patents/US5131247?dq=5131247&hl=tr&sa=X&ei=PSlCVIyKKMTfPZKdgMAO&ved=0CB4Q6AEwAA


Bomb Hammer

Big Bang to celebrate the Holy Community in San Juan de la Vega Celaya Guanajuato Mexico.

2007


Sesame Street: What is a Computer? 1984

What makes a computer different from a person? A computer doesn't have bones.

Smart children are interviewed about computers in the 1984 episode of Sesame Street.


Watch Apple Lay into IBM Over the Years

Apple and IBM announced a sweeping deal to promote iOS in the enterprise this week, but the relationship hasn't always been so cozy. Watch as Cupertino gives IBM a hard time over and over (and over) again.


How Gravity Makes Things Fall

A new demonstration of gravity, featuring the "Spacetime Stretcher," built mostly out of materials from my garage and the hardware store. More info:

1. As a falling object's path goes increasingly in the space (down) direction, it goes a little bit less in the time direction. Gravity is effectively converting some of its travel through time into travel through space. How much time converts into how much space? It works out to be 186,000 miles of space for every second of time -- that's the speed of light! The equivalence between a little time and a lot of space has a parallel with Einstein's famous equation E = mc^2, where a little mass is equivalent to a lot of energy -- also with the speed of light c as the conversion factor, only squared. It's amazing how all these physics concepts fit together.

2. An object moving up or down at the speed of light, such as a photon, follows a vertical path on our graph. If we could warp the Spacetime Stretcher as much as we wanted, we could make the time axis curve around and re-intersect with this vertical line. That would be a black hole: Even a photon moving straight up would get "warped back" to the place where it started.

3. Spacetime warping is usually depicted as going into a higher dimension -- in this case, bending toward or away from the camera. But such a device would have been much harder to build. You can think of this model as a two-dimensional "projection" or "shadow" of three-dimensional curvature, i.e. the flattening of a flared-out surface that curls away from the plane of the graph.

4. In addition to mechanically calculating trajectories of objects falling on the Earth, Mars, or Moon, the Spacetime Stretcher (at a zoomed-out calibration scale) can also calculate the length-contraction and time-dilation observed with a rocket traveling close to the speed of light.